Social media on decline : Social Development

Social media on decline

A year or so back I wrote about giving up my smartphone. Today I read in the Washington Post about former Facebook employee Katherine Losse who left disillusioned with the business of social media, and no doubt now observes Facebook‘s struggle with the mobile generation with some satisfaction. On the back of that I want to offer a perspective on social media as a danger. For me, Facebook and Twitter are declining aspects of my work and social life. I never became a Facebook fan and I used Twitter sparingly. Even this hands-off approach, though, now strikes me as too much. We need to talk about social media.

Let’s start with blogging. When blogging first started the writers who populated the genre were, by and large, people who had a lot to say but who were cut off from mainstream communications. They weren’t journalists or, if they were, then like me they would be freelance. For the freelancers among us blogging was suddenly a way around the editorial gates that constantly frustrated our careers. We could show we could write good stories and strong opinion, left to our own devices. It was a career lift.

Two things happened quickly, though. The first was an extraordinary pecking order that emerged in what was supposedly a more democratic genre. There were celebrity bloggers and then the rest. It seemed, right from its inception, that blogging created a new kind of force, a desire to follow and a willingness to let the genre be, in a sense, monarchical.

Then business stepped in. Companies like Federated Media swept up the star names and built businesses and marketing around them. Enterprises and newspapers also began to blog. Those who had not capitalized quickly on blogging faced a choice. Keep on going at zero income, try to get a business-blogging gig, or give up.

By about 2007 serious blogging was in decline, though it has since revived – at least in numbers. What had died though was the sense that blogging would change opinion in any substantial way. The blogger as minor revolutionary was gone.

No sooner had blogging begun to decline than social networking, Q&A sites like Quora, and microblogging began to pick up. Leading bloggers were quick to use these developments and to dominate or lead the pack here as they had in blogging.

It’s difficult to conceive of these media as channels of opinion but they have become channels to action, channels for organization, like in the Arab Spring and in disaster zones. They are powerful but they are not opinion forming. If anything they amplify the tendency of blogging and all social media to create new elites or new monarchs or new tribal leaders.

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More confirmation on declining LFPR

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JP Morgan: Biggest factor in the declining labor force participation rate is aging of population, not tough economy
Media commentary suggests that the decline in the labor force participation rate (the number of people in the labor force as a percent of the civilian population, aged 16 and older) is due to potential workers abandoning the search for employment because they assume, in this tough economy, there is no job out there for them. However, the facts simply do not support this claim, at least over the past two and a half years. reducing labor force participation has been the explosive growth in those claiming social security disability benefits

Look at studies on violence and the media

by sahd

Especially the effect of long term exposure to violence and the way it does decensitize children to violence.
Look at the decline in social control on our society and the way that this decline emboldens people to act out their violent tendencies.
Look at the trend toward not enforcing societal norms on children so that the child's creativity is not stifled.
There is a lot of research in this area and a lot of theories. I suspect that after columbine even more has been done. Go to the library and do an exhaustive search.
Note: I am talking about a research library UC Berkeley, Stanford, not a public library which will have little to no research available.

How to understand Piketty: read him yourself  — Oxford Student
The first is to applaud Piketty's work, construct some grand theory of social decline such as a new gilded age or a transition to oligarchy, and back his proposals for new taxes and regulation of wealth.

Zim: Health and education bounce back  — Mail & Guardian Online
The scale of the social decline required an equally large-scale national response.

Holyrood Message  — Greenock Telegraph
And this despite the government stating that reversing economic, physical and social decline of communities where market forces alone won't suffice is a top priority.

New Iron App helps bridge the gap between gaming and education  — WalesOnline
The past century has seen the town suffer from relative economic and social decline but there is undoubtedly an economic and cultural renaissance underway.