Decline in social Responsibility : Social Development

Decline in social Responsibility

Tuesday, February 21st, 2012

My hometown of Detroit has been studied obsessively for years by writers and researchers of all types to gain insight into the Motor City’s decline. Indeed, it seems to have become a favorite pastime for urbanists of all stripes. How could such an economic powerhouse, a uniquely American city, so utterly collapse?

Most analysis tends to focus on the economic, social and political reasons for the downfall. One of my favorite treatises on Detroit is The Origins of the Urban Crisis by Thomas Sugrue, who argues that housing and racial discrimination practices put in place after World War II played a primary role in the decline of Motown. I’d argue that it’s closest to the truth of an explanation for Detroit today, but not quite there.

Everyone seems to know the shorthand narrative for Detroit’s fall. Industrial output declines; racial tensions rise. White residents leave; an unapologetic black leadership assumes control. And there’s quite a bit of truth to that narrative. Yes, the auto industry faced stiff competition, moved jobs to the suburbs, moved jobs down south, and later moved jobs out of the country. And all that happened with fewer jobs at each stop. Yes, Detroit does have a regrettably complex racial history and the legacy of two perception-forming riots since World War II (in 1943 and 1967). Yes, Detroit has had its share of political corruption, often tied to the tumultuous mayoral administrations of Coleman Young and Kwame Kilpatrick.

But here’s the thing. Buffalo and Cleveland have suffered the same kind of economic loss, but have not (quite) fallen to the same depths as Detroit. In fact, Pittsburgh suffered as much economically as Detroit, and is now poised for an amazing Rust Belt comeback. Any number of cities has had as troubled a racial legacy as Detroit, without being as adversely impacted. And Detroit certainly hasn’t cornered the market on political corruption, as long as Chicago exists.

You might also like

Europe's Socialism protecting it from having to

by make-a-^Stimulus^

"In addition, since most European countries have an elaborate social safety net, a recession has a less dramatic impact on people’s daily lives. In the U.S., unemployment insurance pays relatively little and runs out relatively quickly, so losing a job usually means a precipitous decline in income. In European countries, unemployment benefits are typically substantial and long-lasting. This is not entirely a plus—it probably makes unemployment higher than it otherwise would be—but in hard times it keeps money in people’s pockets. (And paying for it means that European government spending automatically rises quite a bit during recessions

Praeger Post-Intellectualism and the Decline of Democracy: The Failure of Reason and Responsibility in the Twentieth Century
Book (Praeger)
  • Used Book in Good Condition

Are anganwadis simply crèches for the underprivileged?  — Daily News & Analysis
Their aim is to lay the foundation for proper psychological, physical and social development of the child. The focus is to reduce the incidence of mortality, morbidity, malnutrition and school drop-out.

INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND Aging and Social Expenditure in the Major Industrial Countries, 1980-2025 (Occasional Paper (Intl Monetary Fund))
eBooks (INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND)
State sanctions and the decline in welfare caseloads.(Report): An article from: The Cato Journal
Book (Cato Institute)
INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND Commodity Price Volatility and Inclusive Growth in Low-Income Countries
eBooks (INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND)
INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND Japan's Lost Decade: Policies for Economic Revival
eBooks (INTERNATIONAL MONETARY FUND)