Early Childhood social development stages : Social Development

Early Childhood social development stages

Tweet. Dramatic play is an

Definitions of stages of growth in childhood come from many sources. Theorists such as Jean Piaget, Lev Vygotsky, Lawrence Kohlberg, and Erik Erikson have provided ways to understand development, and recent research has provided important information regarding the nature of development. In addition, stages of childhood are defined culturally by the social institutions, customs, and laws that make up a society. For example, while researchers and professionals usually define the period of early childhood as birth to eight years of age, others in the United States might consider age five a better end point because it coincides with entry into the cultural practice of formal schooling.

There are three broad stages of development: early childhood, middle childhood, and adolescence. The definitions of these stages are organized around the primary tasks of development in each stage, though the boundaries of these stages are malleable. Society's ideas about childhood shift over time, and research has led to new understandings of the development that takes place in each stage.

Early Childhood (Birth to Eight Years)

Early childhood is a time of tremendous growth across all areas of development. The dependent newborn grows into a young person who can take care of his or her own body and interact effectively with others. For these reasons, the primary developmental task of this stage is skill development.

Physically, between birth and age three a child typically doubles in height and quadruples in weight. Bodily proportions also shift, so that the infant, whose head accounts for almost one-fourth of total body length, becomes a toddler with a more balanced, adult-like appearance. Despite these rapid physical changes, the typical three-year-old has mastered many skills, including sitting, walking, toilet training, using a spoon, scribbling, and sufficient hand-eye coordination to catch and throw a ball.

Between three and five years of age, children continue to grow rapidly and begin to develop fine-motor skills. By age five most children demonstrate fairly good control of pencils, crayons, and scissors. Gross motor accomplishments may include the ability to skip and balance on one foot. Physical growth slows down between five and eight years of age, while body proportions and motor skills become more refined.

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Not sure about your state regulations

by teacher1015

But where I work preschool teachers all have degrees in early childhood education. Every year we must take continuing education courses and attend inservices on child development. We are taught to recognize red flags when it comes to stages of speech, social and emotional development.
This teacher did one thing wrong. She diagnosed. We are qualified to recognize signs of delays but we are NOT qualified to offer a diagnosis. What our job should be is to inform the director of the school that we notice a problem. Then together with the director to have a conference with the parent explaining what we are seeing

Connecting to disconnect?  — Kashmir Reader
Research has proven Children's social development is at risk due to increased social isolation as children playing by themselves; their linguistic intellectual and imagination development is at risk.

Habitat for kids and wildlife  — Surrey Leader
“Council recognizes that playgrounds are very important for children's social development, as it is there they get a chance to play, socialize and meet new friends,” said Delta Mayor Lois.