Adolescent social development issues : Social Development

Adolescent social development issues

Teen sitting alone being ignored by other teens.Vicky Kasala/The Image Bank/Getty ImagesThirteen-year-old teens are dealing with the physical changes in their body - puberty - emotionally as well as physically. Change is not easy for most people at any age and your 13-year-old is dealing with one of the biggest changes of their lives. This will cause your young teen to feel uncertain, moody and be sensitive to what others think of them, especially their peers. natalie419 on flickrFor fourteen-year-old teens, puberty has become old news and getting more and more privileges and freedom from parents and 'little kid rules' is what's important. Fourteen-year-old teens feel pretty happy with themselves as much of the angst from the changes they have been going through levels off and then have gotten used to no longer being a young child anymore. While parents can breath a sigh of relief that there are fewer mood swings, be wary of the happy smiling 14-year-old as they often want something. Photo cassandrajowett on flickr.Fifteen-year-old teens are pushing their parents to do more and more on their own, and they do not want to have to ask permission to do it. Independence is the name of the game for a 15-year-old and they are going to try and grab for as much of it as possible. The difference between a 13-year-old teen trying to gain some independence and a 15-year-old teen is that the latter doesn't want to have to seek your permission to do something independently. Photo goodncrazy on flickr.

social emotional development 16 year old teen girlSixteen-year-old teens are comfortable in their own skin and know the ropes as to the life around them. They have learned much about themselves in the past few years and are able to see when they are at their best and when they are at their worst. They also see the best and worst of their parents which will gain you some criticisms and complements - oftentimes right out of the blue.

Getty Images

Seventeen-year-old teens are more in-control of their moods and emotions. They form stronger relationships than in the past and are able to build strong bonds with friends - no more flitting back and forth between cliques. They begin to see their future and can feel both excited and apprehensive about it. The 17-year-old teen has less conflict with parents, but will still push for more independence.

14-Year-Old Emotional Development 17-year-old teen development 18 year old teen girl Parenting Troubled Teens Help and Advice

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by RepostToasties

Daniel Goleman, author of Emotional Intelligence, wrote an interesting piece in response to last year's edge.org question, "What is your dangerous idea?" His response was: "The Internet may harbor social perils our inhibitory circuitry was not designed to handle in evolution." From the essay: "The Internet inadvertently undermines the quality of human interaction, allowing destructive emotional impulses freer reign under specific circumstances. The reason is a neural fluke that results in cyber-disinhibition of brain systems that keep our more unruly urges in check. The tech problem: a major disconnect between the ways our brains are wired to connect, and the interface offered in online interactions

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Daniel Goleman, author of Emotional Intelligence, wrote an interesting piece in response to last year's edge.org question, "What is your dangerous idea?" His response was: "The Internet may harbor social perils our inhibitory circuitry was not designed to handle in evolution." From the essay: "The Internet inadvertently undermines the quality of human interaction, allowing destructive emotional impulses freer reign under specific circumstances. The reason is a neural fluke that results in cyber-disinhibition of brain systems that keep our more unruly urges in check. The tech problem: a major disconnect between the ways our brains are wired to connect, and the interface offered in online interactions

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